Sourdough with whole grain (Sat 30.01)

Sourdough bread with about 2/3 white bread and 1/3 wholemeal flour.

Ingredients.

  • 200 g starter (half water, half flour)
  • 700 g white bread flour
  • 400 g wholemeal flour
  • 700 g water
  • 2 teaspoons salt

1. Reactivate the starter by adding 300g water and 300g white flour. Mix well with a spoon to incorporate enough air. Reserve 200g for future use (in the fridge). Leave remaining to rest/rise for about 6 hours.

2. Batter should be looking active by now (= bubbles visible).

Add the wholemeal to the starter mixture along with 400 g water. Mix well and leave again to rise for 4 to 5 hours.

3.  Batter/dough does not look that foamy as with a 100% white bread flour.

Add the remaining 400g white bread flour and the salt. Mix all together add some water if the dough is to stiff or dry patches remain.

Turn out on work surface and knead the dough for 3 to 5 minutes.

Leave to rise for 2 hours.

4. Turn out on a floured work surface. Form into 2 loaves. The dough is very soft and does not really hold its shape.

Leave to rise for 1 hour to 1 1/2 hour.

5. Breads slashed with 3 cuts each. Bake in a preheated oven at 220 C for about 33 minutes (not too brown). Tap underneath to check if done.

Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Bath buns (Sat 30.01)

Bath buns based on recipe from “La lecon de boulangerie” by Richard Bertinet. English version of this book: “Crust: Bread to Get Your Teeth Into”

Ingredients.

Starter poolish.

  • 125 h White bread flour
  • 125 g water
  • 5 g fresh yeast

Buns

  • 375 g white bread flour
  • 7 g salt
  • 60 g caster sugar
  • 10 g fresh yeast
  • 2 eggs
  • 150 g lukewarm milk
  • 125 g unsalted butter (only used about 100)

glazing

  • milk and sugar

1. Make the starter dough by combining flour, water and yeast.

Mix to a smooth batter and leave to rise for about 2 hours.

2. Mix dry ingredient (flour, salt, sugar). Crumble the yeast in the flour, add the starter and eggs. Add most of the milk and start mixing. The dough will be very soft and sticky. If all ingredients are combined turn out on work surface.

The dough is too soft and sticky for regular kneading. Work the dough by stretching and folding it for some 5 to 10 minutes.

Form into a ball and return to a floured bowl. Leave to rise for an hour.

3. After 1 hour rise turn out on lightly floured surface. Fold the dough and form into a new ball. Leave to rise for another hour.

4. Turn out on floured work surface and divide in 12 parts (first in two, then four then twelve).

Form each piece of dough into a bun and put an a greased baking tin.

Leave to rise for 1 to 2 hours until doubled in size.

5. Glaze the buns with a mixture of milk and sugar.

Bake in a preheated oven for 20 minutes (light brown).

When done glaze again with the milk mixture.

Leave to cool on a wire rack.

bath buns

Basic loaf: Laurel Robertson (Thu 28.01)

Try-out of “A Loaf for Learning” from “The Laurel’s Kitchen Bread Book” by Laurel Robertson. The book has as second title “A Guide to Whole-Grain Breadmaking”. Most of the recipes use whole grain flour, but also other types of grains and breads are covered. A lot of attention to sourdough baking, but never in a ‘fanatic’ way. No full color pictures in this book, but plenty of sound advice.

The recipe takes from page 33 to 67, including a: rockbottom essentials section, evaluation guideline and a questions part. Advise to read all before starting. Every step is explained in a clear and detailed way. Whole grain as a first loaf is challenging, but this turns out to be an excellent bread.

Ingredients (the metric ones, and doubled).

  • 180 ml water
  • 30 g fresh yeast (recipe used 7g active dry yeast)
  • 900 g whole grain wheat flour (finely ground)
  • 2 teaspoons salt (10 g)
  • 160 ml yogurt
  • 320 g hot tap water
  • 60 ml oil (used somewhat less +- 50 g olive oil)
  • 50 ml honey

1. Mix the yeast with the first 180 ml water in a a small bowl. Probably mainly relevant if using dry yeast. Have always the impression that part of the yeast will remain in those little bowls.

 

Put the flour in a bowl and mix with he salt.

Mix yogurt, water and oil together (another bowl 😉 ).

Put the wet ingredients (do not forget the yeast ) and the flour together and start mixing with your hands. Dough will be very sticky.

In the next phase the recipe indicates to check the dough consistency and to add flour if necessary. This dough was more of a batter than a dough. Maybe a measure mistake, so added some additional flour.

If all well mixed turn out on work surface.Knead for 20 minutes. At least that’s what the book says. 10 minutes or 300 strokes normal recipe, to be doubled if using 900 g of lour. Did 300 strokes, dough was coming allready nicely together.

Had to leave the dough for 10 minutes.

After this 30 seconds kneading were enough to get a very smooth dough. This is the technique used by Dan Lepard (use it often). 2 to three short kneadings at 10 minutes interval.

 

Leave to rise for 1 1/2 to 2 hours in a cool place. This dough doubled easily in size after just under 1 hour.

 

The original recipe contains a second rising of 1 hour before making the loafs. As it was allready getting late I had to skip this one an formed the loaves after the first rise.

2. Form into 2 loaves and leave to rise for 1 hour. Book suggests using tins for a first loaf.

3. Bake in a preheated oven at 220 C for about 35 to 40 minutes.

leave to cool on a wire rack.

Remarks.

Recipe contains lots of advice on all steps, some I often use:

– leave to rise in a (cold) oven,

– test if dough is well risen by pressing with a fingertip (formed loaves) or by poking a moist finger in the dough

<br>

Simple buns (Tue 26.01)

Some simple buns for Wednesday breakfast. No butter but cream  used.

Ingredients.

  • 700 g white bread flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon sugar (optional)
  • 20 g fresh yeast
  • 1 egg
  • 200 ml cream (35% fat)
  • 200 ml water

1. Combine flour, salt, cinnamon and sugar in a bowl. Crumble the yeast in the flour, add the egg, the cream and most of the milk.

Start mixing all together into a soft not too sticky dough.

Turn out on work surface and knead for 3 to 5 minutes or until the dough becomes smooth, satin like.

Leave to rise for 50 minutes.

2. Turn out on work surface and form into small buns about 50g each.

Put the buns on a greased tin.

Leave to rise for 1 hour.

3. Glaze the buns with an egg-milk mixture 15 minutes before going into the oven (when I start pre-heating). Glaze a second time before going into the oven. Bake at 200 c for about 22 minutes.

Leave to cool on a wire rack. If you want a soft crust: cover the buns with a dry tea-towel.

Soft bread (Mon 25.01).

Bread with soft pastry flour, some rye and a long rise (most ingredients quite cold as well as the kitchen temp.).

Ingredients.

  • 400 g white bread flour
  • 300 g soft wholemeal pastry/all purpose flour
  • 2 heaped tablespoons rye flour (about 75 g)
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 20 g yeast
  • about 450 g water

1. Mix the flours with the salt.

Crumble in the yeast. Add some of the water, dissolve the yeast .

Add remaining water and start mixing.

The dough is soft and ‘paste’ like. Turn out on work surface and knead for 5 minutes.

Leave to rise for 1 1/2 hour.

2. Turn out on work surface

Form into one round loaf. Put in a greased tin.

And leave to rise for 1 hour or until doubled in size.

3. Bake in a preheated oven at 200c for about 30 – 40 minutes. Check if the bread is done by tapping underneath.

Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Light brown bread (Sun 24.01)

Simple light brown bread.

Ingredients.

  • 350 g white bread flour
  • 350 g wholemeal bread flour
  • 100 g barley flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt (12 g)
  • 20 g yeast
  • 450 g water

1. Mix the flours with the salt.  Crumble the yeast in the flour. Add most of the water. Start mixing the dough, incorporating more and more of the flour. Dough was firm and not too sticky. turn out on work surface.

Knead for 3 minutes.

Leave to rest for 15 minutes.

2. Stretch the dough into a rectangle.

Fold the rectangle in three (like a letter).

Fold the long rectangle in two.

Leave to rise for 50 minutes.

3.  Form into 2 loaves and leave to rise for 1 hour.

4. Bake in a preheated oven at 220 C for about 35 minutes. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Pain de campagne (Sat 23.01)

Pain de campagne started with a poolish. Mainly white flour, some rye and wholemeal added to the starter.

Ingredients.

Poolish.

  • 200 g white bread flour
  • 40 g dark rye flour
  • 40 g wholemeal flour
  • 250 g water
  • 5 g fresh yeast

Bread

  • the poolish
  • 500 g white bread flour
  • 10 g fresh yeast
  • about 300 g water
  • 12 g salt

1. Make the poolish by combining all flours, the water and the yeast.

Mix well to a thick batter. Leave to rise overnight in a cool place :+- 9 hours (if longer store in the fridge, shorter possible at  room temp. for 4 hours).

2. Poolish will be frothy.

Add the flour and yeast to the poolish; start adding the water and mix to a wet, sticky dough. Turn out on work surface, do not flour even if the dough is too sticky.

Knead or stretch/fold the dough for about 8 to 10 minutes. The dough will become less sticky and easier to handle.

Add the salt and continue to knead for another 5 minutes. Alternative is to mix the dough in an electric mixer with a dough hook (5 minutes without the salt, 5 after adding the salt).

Form the dough into a ball and return to a floured bowl.

Leave to rise for min. 1 1/2 hour.

3. Turn out the dough on floured work surface.

Form into a loaf, try not to degas too much.

Leave the loaf to rise. Here on a floured peel, alternative can be seam side up in a floured banneton.

Leave to rise for 1 hour. The dough will not double in size.

4.

Slash the loaf across. Bake in a pre-heated oven at 240 C on a baking stone (used a 37 cm flower pot saucer) for about 35 minutes. Oven temp. can be lowered after inital 15 minutes. Tap underneath to check if bread is done.

Leave to cool on a wire rack.